Tag Archive: disease management

Disease Management for Behavioral Health
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Disease Management for Behavioral Health

December 15, 2016

This is the sixth and final piece in a series of discussions of disease management.  It is probably fitting that the discussion of disease management for behavioral health (BH) is left for last, because that is often what happens to patients

Using a registry to find patients with diabetes and an elevated A1c level
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IT-Enabled Disease Management: Diabetes

October 28, 2016

I previously wrote about the benefits of capturing certain populations of patients in a registry and disease management program.  In the Medicare population, disease management programs are especially useful for patients with six major conditions: heart failure diabetes chronic kidney disease chronic

Heart Disease Patient Identification
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IT and Disease Management: Heart Failure

August 1, 2016

I previously wrote about the benefits of capturing certain populations of patients in a registry and disease management program.  In the Medicare population, disease management programs are especially useful for patients with six major conditions: heart failure diabetes chronic kidney

Managing Chronic Kidney Disease
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IT and Disease Management: Chronic Kidney Disease

July 22, 2016

In a recent blog post, I talked about the benefits of capturing certain populations of patients in a registry and disease management program.  In the Medicare population, disease management programs are especially useful for patients with six major conditions: heart

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Developing an End of Life Care Program

June 2, 2016

I previously used the example of Chronic Kidney Disease to highlight how good data and IT is essential to constructing and running any successful disease management program.  In this post, I am going to describe the rationale for and the

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What is Disease Management?

May 19, 2016

In medical school, doctors learn how to take care of patients one at a time.  But, we are not taught how to care for populations.  The latter is important, because many patients can fall between the cracks of care without